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Wildlife biologist Sarah Boyden speaks about unique parts of bat physiology and natural history, as well as provides an update on white nose syndrome in Maine.
12:00 pm
$5/members free
Part of the Winter Talk series sponsored by Allen Insurance & Financial

Bats can be found in nearly every habitat type in Maine, from pristine forests to urban environments. For a group of species ubiquitous to the summer landscape, we know very little about where they spend the winter. The Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife is conducting research in collaboration with the University of Maine to learn more about winter habitat use. Bats were traditionally thought to spend the winter in large caves, or old mines, called hibernacula. Maine has three known hibernaculum where bats are regularly found hibernating during the winter. Winter acoustic surveys suggest some bats are spending the winter hibernating in talus slopes, which are large boulder fields that appear to offer suitable cover for bats to success
fully overwinter. Come learn more about exciting new discoveries about Maine’s bats.

Sarah Boyden is a regional wildlife biologist with Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife in Strong. She graduated from University of Maine at Farmington with a B.A. in Biology in 2002. Sarah has spent the last 15 years studying bat ecology throughout North America in habitats ranging from the north woods of Maine to the offshore environment.

 

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